The difficulties (which other people surely find incredible) I have in speaking to people arise from the fact that my thinking, or rather the content of my consciousness, is entirely nebulous, that I remain undisturbed by this, so far as it concerns only myself, and am even occasionally self-satisfied; yet conversation with people demands pointedness, solidity, and sustained coherence, qualities not to be found in me. No one will want to lie in clouds of mist with me, and even if someone did, I couldn’t expel the mist from my head; when two people come together it dissolves of itself and is nothing.

Franz Kafka (via fernsandmoss)

A Writer’s Tools

A writer’s tools might include an inkwell and papyrus scrolls or less expensive wax tablets and stylus. The tablets could also be bound and they could be erased with the flat end of the stylus. Papyrus was made of the pith of a water plant; ink was a mixture of soot, resin, wine dregs and cuttlefish.

Roman Terracotta Inkwell (1st or 2nd Century A.D.)

Roman/Egyptian Papyrus Letter (early 3rd Century A.D.)

Byzantine/Egyptian Wooden Tablet (500-700 A.D.)

Roman Bronze Stylus (1st or 2nd Century A.D.)

  (x)(x)(x)(x) The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

(Source: last-of-the-romans)

victoriousvocabulary:

SOLISEQUIOUS
[adjective]
following the course of the sun; attracted to the sun, as in solisequious plants such as sunflowers.
Etymology: from Latin sol, “sun” + sequi, “to follow”.
[Heather Watts - Sun God]

victoriousvocabulary:

SOLISEQUIOUS

[adjective]

following the course of the sun; attracted to the sun, as in solisequious plants such as sunflowers.

Etymology: from Latin sol, “sun” + sequi, “to follow”.

[Heather Watts - Sun God]

"Autumn Movement" - Carl Sandburg

missedstations:

I cried over beautiful things knowing no beautiful thing lasts.

The field of cornflower yellow is a scarf at the neck of the copper
sunburned woman, the mother of the year, the taker of seeds.

The northwest wind comes and the yellow is torn full of holes,
new beautiful things come in the first spit of snow on the northwest wind,
and the old things go, not one lasts.

Music to hear, why hear’st thou music sadly?
Sweets with sweets war not, joy delights in joy.
Why lovest thou that which thou receivest not gladly,
Or else receivest with pleasure thine annoy?
If the true concord of well-tuned sounds,
By unions married, do offend thine ear,
They do but sweetly chide thee, who confounds
In singleness the parts that thou shouldst bear.
Mark how one string, sweet husband to another,
Strikes each in each by mutual ordering,
Resembling sire and child and happy mother
Who all in one, one pleasing note do sing:
Whose speechless song, being many, seeming one,
Sings this to thee: ‘thou single wilt prove none.’

Sonnet 8 bu William Shakespeare (via dailyshakespeare)

victoriousvocabulary:

REVENANT
[noun]
1. a person who returns.
2. a person who returns, supposedly from the dead.
3. a person who returns as a spirit after death; ghost.
Etymology: from French for ghost, from revenir, “to come back”, from Latin revenīre, from re- prefix for “again” + venīre, “to come”.
[Lenka Simeckova - Ghosts]

victoriousvocabulary:

REVENANT

[noun]

1. a person who returns.

2. a person who returns, supposedly from the dead.

3. a person who returns as a spirit after death; ghost.

Etymology: from French for ghost, from revenir, “to come back”, from Latin revenīre, from re- prefix for “again” + venīre, “to come”.

[Lenka Simeckova - Ghosts]

Today’s Classic: John Tenniel (1820-1914) the original illustrator of Lewis Carroll’s “Alice in Wonderland” and “Through the Looking Glass” books.

via fer1972

backroadshaiku:

wisps of clouds  - 

speaking to each other

without words

    ____

the path I make

in tall field grass

… doppler crows

    ____

north star…

a singular face

in a crowded room

lifeisagifthorse:

Libreria Acqua Alta, Venezia; El Péndulo, Città del Messico; Livraria Lello, Oporto, Portogallo;Honesty Bookshop, Hay on Wye, Galles;El Ateneo, Buenos Aires; Bart’s Books, California; Polare. Maastricht, Olanda;Shakespeare & Company, Parigi